Falmouth Art Market Features Music by Kathleen Healy and Kim Moberg with Heather Swanson, Works by Colleen Corson and Others on Thursday, July 19

The Falmouth Art Market will feature music by Kathleen Healy and Kim Moberg Thursday, July 19 along with an array works by 28 artists and craftspeople. The weekly event takes place from noon to 5 PM at Falmouth Marine Park, 180 Scranton Avenue, on Falmouth Harbor, every Thursday through August 30. There will be music from noon to 4:30 this week.

Singer/songwriter Kathleen Healy, whose June 28 performance was rained out, will play from noon to 2 PM. Kim Moberg, accompanied by Heather Swanson on fiddle, will follow from 2:30 to 4:30 PM.

A fingerpick-style guitarist, Kim Moberg taught herself to strum and finger pick to her favorite songs by singer/songwriters of the 1960s and 1970s. Her original songs speak to reunion, awakening, and social consciousness.

Due to debilitating stage fright, Moberg initially played and sang only in her basement, unable to pursue her dream of becoming a professional performer. In 2014, she set out to overcome her stage fright. In 2017, Kim released her debut CD titled “Above Ground” that celebrates the achievement of that goal. For more information, visit www.kimmobergmusic.com

Kathleen Healy draws from her experience of living and raising a family near the beach for many of her songs. She writes from the heart, and her honest lyrics and often-poignant subject matter complement her unique voice.

Healy performs throughout southern New England. She hosts open mic nights at local venues and enjoys supporting the local live music scene and collaborating with other musicians. She is working on her second studio album, “Vagabond.” Her first CD, “Spark,” was released in 2014. For more information, visit www.kathleenhealy.com.

Colleen Corson, owner of Arts of Palm, makes colorful, realistic fish sculptures from palm tree materials she finds in the Florida Keys. Originally from Massachusetts, Corson lived in the Keys from the 1970s through the 1990s and now spends the winters there, summering on the Cape.

“Making fish started out as a hobby about 10 years ago,” said Corson, “and my work has evolved over the years from funky folk art to realistic depictions of specific species of fish.

“This summer I am working on an endangered species collection to raise awareness about species on the verge of extinction. There are over 2,000 species of marine animals on the endangered species list,” she said. “It’s important that we try to do something about that.”

A lot of work goes into the fish sculptures, which are typically several feet in length. First Corson gathers the elongated coconut seed pods that she uses for the body of the fish and the bark and leaves she uses for the fins and tail. Each pod has a different shape, suggesting different species to Corson. After choosing a pod, she glues on the fin and tails and coats the fish with primer.

She then paints the fish with acrylic paints, using photos of fish to create accurate representations. Finally, she seals the paint with an acrylic sealer, and the fish is ready to hang on the wall.

She uses a similar procedure to make decorative platters and trays from the seed pods and also paints nature-inspired art on canvas and on floor cloths. “It is functional artwork,” said Corson. “People say, ‘Oh, I would never walk on the floor cloths,’ but they are very durable, very easy to clean, and made to be walked on.”

Corson’s artwork may also be seen at Under the Sun in Woods Hole.

For more information on the Falmouth ArtMarket, visit www.falmouthartmarket.com or www.facebook.com/FalmouthArtMarket/


Falmouth Art Market Features Works by John Russo and Others, and Music by the Harper and the Minstrel on Thursday, July 12

The Falmouth Art Market will feature music by The Harper and the Minstrel on Thursday, July 12 along with an array works by 28 artists and craftspeople. The weekly event takes place from noon to 5 PM at Falmouth Marine Park, 180 Scranton Avenue, on Falmouth Harbor, every Thursday through August 30. Musicians perform from 2 to 4 PM every week.

The Harper and The Minstrel are Jay and Abby Michaels, who describe themselves as “passionate performers of music from the past,” including expressive love songs, vibrant jigs, reels, and dances, authentic medieval and Renaissance music, and traditional Celtic music.

Both Jay and Abby sing and play a variety of diverse musical instruments, including the cláirseach an (Irish wire-strung harp), Gothic harp, Celtic folk harp, bowed psaltery, alto, soprano, and tenor recorders, Irish wooden flute, penny whistles, mountain dulcimer, hammered dulcimer, bowed dulcimer/viol, baroque guitar, and rebec (an early bowed instrument).

Jay’s harp-playing has been heard on numerous television shows and several independent films. In addition to playing many different instruments, Abby recently built her own hammered dulcimer, which she plays in concert.

John Russo creates functional, practical pottery in earthy, natural tones, with some subtle shades of reds, blues, and greens. He makes bowls of all kinds, including berry bowls, knitting bowls, salad bowls, and vases.

Russo is also a woodcarver and makes wooden spoons and knives “for spreading humus on crackers” and other uses. He also makes wooden ducks out of old golf drivers. After removing the shaft he affixes a hand-carved duck head to the driver head, creating a wonderful decorative piece for those who love golf, ducks, or both.

A member of the ArtMarket for the last 10 years, Russo has been making pottery for over 30 years, while he operated his main business, an art gallery and custom framing shop.

“Toward the end of my degree work in graphic arts, I had some time in my schedule and decided to take a pottery course,” said Russo, who was so captivated that he went back for a second class after he finished his degree.

It was a busy and stressful time. Both Russo and his wife were working and going to school and they were about to have a baby. Pottery-making became a respite from worries about paying the rent, buying groceries, and other concerns.

“It was a release,” Russo said. “You have to concentrate fully to make pottery and to do it well. You put all your cares and woes out of your mind to think about this piece of clay in front of you.”

Russo also enjoys the camaraderie of pottery-making. He enjoys helping others work out problems they have been having and has served as a teaching assistant over the years. Pottery-making has been a very enjoyable and productive hobby for him.

For more information on the Falmouth ArtMarket, visit www.falmouthartmarket.com or https://www.facebook.com/FalmouthArtMarket/


 

Falmouth Art Market Features Works by Sandra Faxon and Others, and Music by the Familiars of Cape Cod on Thursday, July 5

The Falmouth Art Market will feature music by the Familiars of Cape Cod on Thursday, July 5 along with an array works by artists and craftspeople. The weekly event takes place from noon to 5 PM at Falmouth Marine Park, 180 Scranton Avenue, on Falmouth Harbor, every Thursday through August 30. Musicians perform from 2 to 4 PM every week.

Manny and Linda Dias are The Familiars of Cape Cod. They sing and play folk, fiddle, country, Irish, and popular music from the 1950s through the 1980s. Manny sings and plays guitar, and Linda plays fiddle, mandolin, harmonica, and Irish whistles.

The Falmouth ArtMarket offers an array of creations by 28 local artists and craftspeople every week.

Sandra Faxon is a long-time member of the ArtMarket and owned the Local Colors Gallery in Woods Hole “for 15 wonderful years” until she closed it this past December. Faxon creates whimsical cut-paper collages and watercolors of sea creatures and local scenes. Visitors will find colorful sea birds, monkfish, turtles, frogs, crabs, octopi, sailboats, beach scenes, and much more.

Her joy in creating art is evident in her work. Full of life, color, and spirit, her collages and watercolors are buoyant depictions of Falmouth and Cape Cod life, from the most intimate look at a tiny crustacean to a large beach or village scene.

Faxon describes her collages as “painting with scissors.” She uses different types of vividly colored hand-painted and hand-made papers, many of which she creates herself. She enjoys experimenting with the paper, painting large sheets in different ways, sometimes marbled, glazed or painted in pastels or oils, creating different effects.

Her inspirations clearly come from her surroundings. “I live in a wonderful location and know a lot of artists and scientists who are interested in nature, music, and dance,” she said. Friends request certain images: a particular seabird or mollusk, or a favorite pet, and Faxon will spend time researching so that she can present an accurate, if lighthearted, image of the animal.

Faxon took her first art class in the 1940s when she was 8. The teacher had the students sit in the hallway and draw pictures of the hallway. Faxon said she would never take another art class. “In the 1940s,” she said, “if you didn’t draw a sun round and yellow, you were doomed.”

She never did take another art class, but the experience stayed with her, and in college she explored ways of teaching art creatively. Faxon became an educational workshop leader, integrating the creative arts (music, movement, drama, and art). She also had a career as a child and family therapist and often used the creative arts in therapy. “Sometimes words just get in the way,” she said.

Faxon, who started making her collages when she retired at the age of 63, has a word of advice for those who might be interested in making art themselves. “It is never too late to tap into your creative self!”

In addition to ArtMarket Thursdays, Faxon can be found on Tuesdays at Cape Cod Bagel and Saturdays and Sundays at the Woods Hole Firehouse Art Market. Parhiala at parhialaj@hotmail.com.

For more information on the Falmouth ArtMarket, visit www.falmouthartmarket.com or https://www.facebook.com/FalmouthArtMarket/

Falmouth Art Market Features Artists, Crafters, and the Music of Kathleen Healy on Thursday, June 28

The Falmouth Art Market will feature music by singer/songwriter Kathleen Healy on Thursday, June 28, along with an array works by artists and craftspeople. The weekly event takes place from noon to 5 PM at Falmouth Marine Park, 180 Scranton Avenue, on Falmouth Harbor, every Thursday through August 30. Musicians perform from 2 to 4 PM every week.

For many of her songs, Kathleen Healy draws from her experience of living and raising a family near the beach. Some say salt water runs through her veins. She writes from the heart and her honest lyrics and often poignant subject matter lend themselves to the unique quality of her voice.

Healy performs throughout southern New England as a solo performer. She hosts open mic nights at local venues and thoroughly enjoys supporting the live music scene on Cape Cod and collaborating with other local musicians. When she is not performing or hosting, Kathleen can be found back in the studio recording her second studio album, “Vagabond.” Her CD, “Spark,” was released in 2014.

The Falmouth ArtMarket offers an array of artists and craftspeople, many of whom will be working on their art at the market and happy to discuss their creative processes and products with visitors.

Members of the ArtMarket include Pam Washburn, who crochets afghans, ponchos, and a variety of other item; Martine Bindler-Desbiens, of Craft-tine, who makes cards, boxes, and wreaths out of paper; fine art photographer Carl Sheffer, who captures colorful, exotic, and unusual subjects worldwide; Richard Heath of Grandpa Granny Squares, who makes hand-crocheted afghans; Colleen Corson, who makes decorative fish wall hangings and bowls of materials she collects from palm trees in the Florida Keys; John Russo, who makes functional and decorative pottery; Sandra Faxon, of Local Colors Gallery, who creates paper collages and watercolors with a touch of whimsy; Irene Young, who handspins her own yarn, mostly from angora goat curls (fine kid mohair); Dante, an artist who paints local and New England scenes; Marilyn Rowland, who creates fun and festive beach-inspired jewelry; Jane Parhiala, who handweaves runners, wall hangings, towels, pillows, scarves, bags, and Peace flags, and several more.

Artists who would like to be part of the ArtMarket may contact Jane Parhiala at parhialaj@hotmail.com.

For more information on the Falmouth ArtMarket, visit www.falmouthartmarket.com or https://www.facebook.com/FalmouthArtMarket/

Falmouth Art Market Features Artists, Crafters, and the Music of Jerry Doherty Thursday, June 21

The Falmouth Art Market will feature music by songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Jerry Doherty on Friday, June 21, along with an array works by artists and craftspeople. The weekly event takes place noon to 5 PM at Falmouth Marine Park, 180 Scranton Avenue, on Falmouth Harbor, every Thursday through August 30. Musicians perform from 2 to 4 PM every week.

Jane Parhiala, a member of the Falmouth Cultural Council, which sponsors the event, is also one of the artists. She is a weaver, creating woven runners, wall hangings, towels, pillows, bags, cloth, and peace flags. The yarns are soft, often handspun, and the colors are subtle hues of secondary and tertiary colors—soft purples, lavenders, greens, golds, and orange, as well as natural and neutral shades of yarn.

“I love the colors of the threads and the textures. I love putting colors together; the harmony gives me joy,” said Parhiala. “I also love the natural shades of wool, the greys and whites. I like beauty, coordinating colors, and making beautiful things.”

Parhiala weaves on a 26-inch wide Japanese Saori loom, which encourages free expression and spontaneity. “It’s really a philosophy of weaving, a little spiritual and meditative,” said Parhiala. “You kind of go with whatever you are feeling that day. You don’t follow a pattern as in formal weaving.”

Parhiala was a massage therapist for 28 years, and before that, a special education teacher. She began weaving about eight years ago at the Falmouth Art Center (then at the Falmouth Artists Guild’s Main Street location), but weaving did not come out of the blue.

“I have always been interested in textiles and have been designing and sewing my own clothes most of my life,” she said. “I had a boutique on Martha’s Vineyard in the 1980s. I sewed custom clothes from Japanese, Guatemalan, and African fabrics, as well as whatever people brought me.”

Parhiala took up weaving after retirement. “It’s the perfect thing for me,” she said. “This is my life—textiles, colors, and textures. And I love it.”

Solo guitarist Jerry Doherty plays an amalgamation of roots music, folk music, blues, old-school jazz, and country music. Playing well-known music and his own compositions, aiming to create a feel-good atmosphere.

Doherty has opened for such acts as the Beach Boys, Charlie Daniels, Alan Jackson, Allison Krauss, Sawyer Brown, and many others. His band, Matters of the Heart, performed in Nashville at the Grand Ole Opry, the Long Haul, and Douglas Corner. He was invited to perform at the Bluebird Café in Nashville, an honor for songwriters.

Doherty has recorded four CDs and played in countless sessions as a studio musician. His 1997 CD, “Backed in a Corner,” was selected as Album of the Year by the Independent Country Music Association of America.

After years on the road and in Nashville, he has returned to his home state of Massachusetts in 2015 and now lives on Cape Cod, performing on the Cape and South Shore.

For more information on the Falmouth ArtMarket, visit www.falmouthartmarket.com or https://www.facebook.com/FalmouthArtMarket/

 

Make a free website with Yola